Page last updated at 10:37 GMT, Wednesday, 7 January 2009

Culture capital's impact debated

Andy Burnham
The debate is being held at the University of Liverpool

A debate on the effects Liverpool's year as Capital of Culture has had on the city will be led by Culture Secretary Andy Burnham.

Experts will also discuss the issues raised in a recent research project set up to evaluate the social, cultural, economic and environmental impact.

Research found 75% of new visitors to Liverpool were influenced by the fact it was culture capital for the year.

The debate is being held at the University of Liverpool later.

Deputy Chair of the Culture Company, Phil Redmond, will also attend, along with Chief Executive of Arts Council England, Alan Davey, University of Liverpool Pro-Vice-Chancellor and author of Liverpool 800, Professor John Belchem and Director of Impacts 08 research project, Dr Beatriz Garcia.

'Future progress'

Impacts 08 was a joint project between the University of Liverpool and Liverpool John Moores University.

It found that many of the landmark Capital of Culture events brought in millions of pounds to the city's economy.

The Tall Ships event, held in July, brought in 8.2m, and the Liverpool Sound Paul McCartney concert brought in 5m.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Sir Howard Newby, said: "The university has played a major role in the city's cultural programme throughout 2008 and we will continue to support the city in its development."

He added: "Liverpool's year as Capital of Culture generated great energy and excitement in and around the city and we hope this will be sustained as we look forward to 2009."

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