Page last updated at 14:49 GMT, Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Freed child rapist, 16, detained

Minshull Street Crown Court
The boy's offences were described as 'deeply disturbing'

A teenager who kidnapped and raped a five-year-old boy, eight days after avoiding custody for another rape, has been detained for at least three years.

The 16-year-old admitted offences against the second boy including rape and child abduction.

Manchester's Minshull Street Crown Court heard the attack happened after he was given a community order for the rape of a boy aged seven in Tameside.

The first sentence, by Judge Adrian Smith, provoked a legal challenge.

On Wednesday, the attacker, who cannot be named, was given an indeterminate sentence for protection of the public after committing a second attack.

'Deeply disturbing'

He must serve a minimum of three years minus five days before being considered for parole.

But Judge Peter Lakin told him: "The offences you have committed are deeply disturbing and very serious.

Det Con Terry Farrell read out a statement from the victim's father

"You are a devious and manipulative young man with an unhealthy and completely unacceptable sexual interest in young boys.

"It is likely you will not be released for some very considerable period of time."

He added that it was "highly unusual" for a court to categorise a 16-year-old as a danger to the public but in this case it was merited.

"I have to say I have absolutely no hesitation whatsoever in reaching the conclusion that you are indeed a dangerous offender," the judge said.

The boy was sentenced to three years and four months, but will be eligible for parole earlier because of time spent in custody.

Appeal bid

Judge Lakin also revoked the community rehabilitation order passed by Judge Adrian Smith and resentenced him for the earlier rape offences against the seven-year-old.

He was sentenced to three years and four months, to run concurrently, and placed on the Sex Offenders Register.

In sentencing for the first rape, Judge Smith is believed to have considered the victim's family, who forgave the youth because of their Christian beliefs.

The three-year community order led to an appeal by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), but was overtaken when, just days after appearing in court, he was arrested for the second rape.

Rape is rape and whether you are 16 or 60, it is one of the most horrific crimes anyone can commit
Det Con Terry Farrell

On 4 July 2009, the second victim, who is now six, was playing outside near his home when he was lured away to look for a lost football but was actually taken to the teenager's house and abused.

He was found emerging from the house while his parents searched the neighbourhood for him.

The teenager later admitted child abduction, rape, committing an offence with the intention of committing a sexual offence, attempted rape and causing a child to engage in sexual activity.

Speaking after the hearing, Det Con Terry Farrell, who led the investigation, said it was a "harrowing and disturbing" case.

"Rape is rape and whether you are 16 or 60, it is one of the most horrific crimes anyone can commit. For this to happen to a five-year-old boy is beyond comprehension."

He then went on to read a statement on behalf of the father of the victim.

He said: "This has been a traumatic ordeal for my whole family, and particularly for my six-year-old son who has had to go through what no-one, let alone a young innocent boy, should ever have to go through.

"It has been a harrowing time but I'm glad it is finally over and we can now draw a line under everything and move on with our lives."



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SEE ALSO
Judges follow sentence guidelines
11 Nov 09 |  England
Freed child rapist attacks again
05 Oct 09 |  Manchester

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