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Last Updated: Thursday, 18 January 2007, 11:02 GMT
Inquiry into Joe Geeling murder
Joe Geeling
Joe Geeling was stabbed 16 times by Hamer
An independent inquiry is under way in Greater Manchester to review the issues surrounding the murder of Joe Geeling.

The serious case review at Bury Council will examine whether any lessons can be learned from the 11-year-old's death.

Joe's parents and the family of killer Michael Hamer have been invited to contribute to the inquiry, carried out by a panel of child experts.

On Wednesday, judges delayed a decision on whether to increase the sentence given to his killer Michael Hamer.

Council bosses said the review was ordered by the Bury Safeguarding Children Board (BSCB) in December.

It is required by law to consider the circumstances of all children who die unexpectedly in the borough.

The purpose of a serious case review is to ensure all of the agencies involved in a child's life worked together to safeguard and promote their welfare.

Michael Hamer
Hamer's minimum term was set at 12 years

Councillor Maggie Gibb, executive member for children and young people, said: "The purpose of a Serious Case Review is not to point the finger or try to place blame onto a particular organisation for the tragic circumstances which led to the death of Joe Geeling.

"It is to find out if there are ways to improve practice and so reduce the likelihood of a death like this happening again."

Michael Hamer, 15, lured Joe back to his house in Bury on 1 March 2006.

He beat him 16 times with a frying pan and stabbed him before dumping his body in a local park.

Hamer was jailed for life for murder with a minimum term of 12 years.

Three appeal court judges are to rule at a later date over whether they agree with the Attorney General's argument that the sentence was too lenient.


SEE ALSO
Schoolboy killer appeal delayed
17 Jan 07 |  Manchester
Memorial for murdered schoolboy
28 Dec 06 |  Manchester

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