Page last updated at 15:24 GMT, Tuesday, 11 May 2010 16:24 UK

Men jailed for acid revenge attack in London

Mohammed Vakas (l), Mohammed Adeel (middle) and Fabion Kuci (r)
Three men carried out the 'horrific' attack on Awais Akram

Three men who stabbed a man and doused him with acid over an online affair have been jailed at the Old Bailey.

Awais Akram, 25, was disfigured after being attacked in Leytonstone last July for a relationship with Sadia Khatoon.

Her brother Mohammed Vakas, 26, of Walthamstow, was given a 30-year sentence for conspiracy to murder.

Mohammed Adeel, 20, of Walthamstow, and Fabion Kuci, 17, of Harlesden, got 13 and eight-year sentences for conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm.

Both Adeel and Kuci were found not guilty of conspiracy to murder. A ban on naming the teenager because of his age was lifted after the sentencing.

This was a terrible crime and all right-thinking citizens reject the premise on which it was done
Judge Brian Barker

The victim was targeted for his relationship with Mrs Khatoon, who he met on social networking website Facebook.

The court heard that when her husband Shakeel Abassi found out about it he persuaded her to lure Mr Akram to the attack scene.

He was then beaten and stabbed before sulphuric acid was poured over him. It left the victim with 47% burns and he nearly died, the court heard.

Judge Brian Barker said: "The facts of this case are horrifying. This was a remorseless and a heartless plan.

Awais Akram before the acid attack
Awais Akram was disfigured in the attack

"It was to punish and kill Mr Akram in the most cruel and sadistic way."

He continued: "This was a terrible crime and all right-thinking citizens reject the premise on which it was done. There is no honour, and plots and actions such as this have no place in our society.

"Few of us will have seen anything like that before and we must all hope we don't see anything like that again."

Both Sadia Khatoon and Shakeel Abassi have since disappeared and are believed to be in the Islamabad area of Pakistan.

The judge said they "were central to this plan and should have been in the dock".

'Like a zombie'

Mr Akram, who has had "innumerable" operations and still needs medical treatment, has told the court how he was left in so much pain he wanted to die.

He was left blind in his right eye, suffered facial fractures and had to have both ears amputated.

Mr Akram has also been left with "deep" psychological problems.

Awais Akram
Awais Akram lost both ears and an eye

Prosecutor David Markham said earlier: "A witness was to see the victim as he begged for help, with his clothes in tatters and literally falling off him from the acid and blood coming from his nose and eyes and covering his bare chest.

"The witness told police the figure looked like a cross between a zombie from a horror movie and the Incredible Hulk."

Describing the pain, Mr Akram earlier said: "I started burning, my whole body started to burn.

"At that point I just felt that I would be dead. Death was, I felt, a better solution than to be burning like this."

The court heard the relationship did not go beyond kisses and touching as Mrs Khatoon made it clear she "did not want to have sexual relations".



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SEE ALSO
Men guilty of revenge acid attack
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