Page last updated at 09:49 GMT, Monday, 29 March 2010 10:49 UK

Twelve charged with murdering boy at Victoria station

Sofyen Belamouadden
Sofyen Belamouadden was a pupil at Henry Compton School in Fulham

Twelve teenagers have been charged with the murder of a 15-year-old boy who was stabbed at an Underground station in central London.

Sofyen Belamouadden, from Acton, west London, suffered multiple stab wounds when he was attacked at Victoria Underground station on Thursday.

Seven other youths have been bailed by police.

Three boys and one girl who were arrested on Monday in connection with the murder remain in custody.

Sofyen was a pupil at the Henry Compton School in Fulham. Police recovered two knives from the scene of the stabbing.

Pre-arranged fight

British Transport Police's Det Supt Ashley Croft said the teenager had tragically lost his life through a "reckless act of violence".

The 12 charged youths are made up of four aged 16 and eight aged 17 and all come from the south London area.

They are expected to appear at West London Youth Court later.

Police believe a fight at the station had been pre-arranged.

It is also understood that on Wednesday night up to 15 teenagers had clashed there.

A shopkeeper at the station said youngsters had been causing trouble there over the past few weeks.

"One day last week a gang chased a boy into a shop and attacked him and trashed the place," he said.

Sofyen played football for Acton Garden Village Youth Sunday League team in West London and for Chelsea Kicks, a scheme run by the Premier League club for young people in deprived areas.



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