Page last updated at 18:49 GMT, Thursday, 1 October 2009 19:49 UK

West Ham 'hooligan' CCTV issued

Men wanted by police
The men were all captured by CCTV within Upton Park stadium

Police investigating rioting and a pitch invasion at the clash between West Ham and Millwall have released pictures of those they want to talk to.

The images of 17 men, all thought to be West Ham fans, were issued after fights marred a Carling Cup game on 25 August.

The pictures are from CCTV cameras within the ground.

A man was stabbed, missiles were thrown at police and there were 10 arrests at the game. Both clubs have been charged with failing to control supporters.

Ch Supt Steve Wisbey, in charge of policing the match, said: "A team of police officers are reviewing all the events that took place on the night and we continue to look at CCTV to identify offenders.

"We will seek to obtain football banning orders for those responsible so they will not be permitted in stadiums throughout the country or abroad."

Fights broke out at about 1800 BST before the game started and were still raging five hours later.

Inside the stadium the pitch was invaded three times.

At its height, several hundred West Ham fans had congregated outside the stadium bombarding police with bottles.

About 200 riot police and 20 mounted police were used to quell the trouble, with a police helicopter circling the area.



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