Page last updated at 16:36 GMT, Tuesday, 14 July 2009 17:36 UK

Games may spark prostitution rise

Prostitutes in Lithuania
Officers from the Met are in Lithuania to warn women about trafficking

London could see an increase in prostitution and sex trafficking in the lead up to the 2012 Olympics.

A report by the Metropolitan Police Authority (MPA) warned the increase in would put women at risk.

Thousands of site workers, spectators and athletes are expected to fuel the sex industry boom.

During the Athens Games, sex trafficking almost doubled and there were reports of sex attacks in the athletes' village at Sydney in 2000.

A small increase in the number of trafficked women working in the five Olympic host boroughs has already been noted.

The eyes of the world will be on London during 2012 and the possibility of damage to the reputation of not only the Met but London and the UK is considerable
Lynne Abrams, MPA

Lynne Abrams, of the MPA, said despite warnings, people responsible for security during the Olympics have not yet formed plans to tackle the issue.

"There is considerable international evidence to suggest that such an increase in population in the context of the Games may have an impact on women's safety."

She added: "The eyes of the world will be on London during 2012 and the possibility of damage to the reputation of not only the Met but London and the UK is considerable."

Officers will be trained to spot women who are forced to work as prostitutes and the police are also expecting a rise in domestic attacks, rape and sexual assaults following increased drinking during the Games.

A special team of officers will work with the boroughs in east London and immigration officers to target those involved in human trafficking, the report said.

In the lead up to the Games, 100,000 people will be involved with the preparation and the event itself will see 10,500 athletes, hundreds of thousands of spectators and 20,000 journalists.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Olympic hopeful opens NZ brothel
12 Jul 09 |  Asia-Pacific


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific