Page last updated at 13:30 GMT, Monday, 30 March 2009 14:30 UK

Pupils design London Zoo exhibit

Children from Gower School at Animal Adventure
Animal Adventure is built on the same spot as the original children's zoo

Youngsters who helped design a new exhibit at London Zoo have seen their creation for the first time.

Pupils from Gower School in Islington, north London, gave their ideas for secret child-only viewing areas at the £3.2m Animal Adventure attraction.

They had been given an advance viewing of the exhibit, which allows children to get up close to the animals, ahead of the public opening on Thursday.

The exhibit features a viewing bubble in the middle of an aardvark enclosure.

Animal Adventure is built on the same spot as the original children's zoo, which opened in 1938.

Four zones

It is split into four zones called, Treetop, Underground, Splash and Touch.

The youngsters from Gower School will also get the chance to help keepers with porcupine training and to feed llamas and alpacas.

The students had been consulted in the design process through brainstorms, storytelling and activity sessions last summer.

Jim Mackie from London Zoo said: "Animal adventure is all about children, predominantly, having fun.

"It's about them enjoying themselves, coming into this area and see really amazing animals and while they are going around the different zones they can learn a little bit as well."



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