Page last updated at 03:13 GMT, Monday, 2 March 2009

Survey looks at views on creation

Charles Darwin
Darwinian theories are believed by some to dispel the need for God

One-fifth of Londoners reject Darwin's theory of evolution and instead think human beings were created by God over the last 10,000 years, a survey said.

People were asked their views on evolution and the origins of mankind, ahead of a major conference on Tuesday in Rome on religion and science.

Some 31% of Londoners believed evolution removed the need for God.

The research, published by the theology think tank Theos, involved 2,000 people across the UK.

The report, Faith and Darwin, went on to claim that 27% of Londoners believed in theistic evolution - the belief that humans evolved by a process of evolution which can be seen as God's plan.

And 12% believed in intelligent design - the belief that humans evolved by a process of evolution which required the special intervention of God or a higher power at key stages.

Commenting on the research, conducted by pollster ComRes, Paul Woolley, Director of Theos, said: "The wide range of views across London regarding the origin of human life is striking.

"The public are often offered a strange choice by well-known atheists, evolution or God?

"Interestingly, Charles Darwin considered that to be a false choice. Darwin believed that it was perfectly possible to believe in God and in the theory of evolution."



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