Page last updated at 12:24 GMT, Thursday, 1 January 2009

Tube and bus fares increase by 6%

A Tube train
London bus and tube fares will rise for most passengers

The cost of travel on London's transport network is set to rise by an an average of 6%.

The increases, effective on 2 January, were announced by Mayor Boris Johnson in September and include a 10p rise in a single Oyster card bus journey to 1.

The new pricing scheme does include some fare reductions aimed at encouraging commuters to travel off- peak after 0930 and before 1600.

The mayor said the fare rises were required to properly fund the system.

HOW FARES WILL CHANGE

Single bus fare paid with an Oyster card will increase from 90p to 1
A one day bus and tram pass will rise from 3 to 3.30
A weekly bus pass will go up from 13 to 13.80
The 4 adult cash fare in Zone One of the tube will be frozen
Fares in other zones will go up from 3 to 3.20.
The minimum adult cash fare on the Docklands Light Railway rises from 1.50 to 1.60
Mr Johnson blamed former mayor Ken Livingstone's pre-election fare freeze for leaving an 80m gap in transport funding that needed to be filled with higher fares.

But critics argued that any decision on fare pricing, which ultimately lies with Mr Johnson, includes his own plan to scrap the western extension of the congestion zone.

Transport for London is upgrading major parts of the system in preparation for the 2012 Olympics and is also investing in the Crossrail link.

The new pricing does offer half-price bus and tram fares for Londoners on benefits and the Freedom Pass for the over 60s and disabled passengers will have the off-peak use restrictions lifted, allowing the elderly to travel before 0930.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Mayor raises bus and Tube fares
04 Sep 08 |  London

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific