Page last updated at 12:09 GMT, Saturday, 27 December 2008

Boos as singer opens Harrods sale

Katherine Jenkins and Mohamed Al Fayed
Katherine Jenkins was met by Harrods owner Mohamed Al Fayed

Anti-fur campaigners booed opera singer Katherine Jenkins as she arrived at Harrods to open its winter sale.

Protesters shouted "shame on Katherine" as she arrived by horse-drawn carriage.

The Welsh star turned out after chart-topping singer Leona Lewis reportedly refused to open the sale because of Harrods' policy of selling fur.

Protesters claim Harrods is the only major store in the UK to sell imported fur. No-one from the Knightsbridge store was available for comment.

The boos were eventually drowned out by cheers from bargain hunters queuing outside as the singer was ushered into the store by owner Mohamed Al Fayed.

Anti-fur protest placards
Anti-fur protesters turned out in force for the sale

Campaigner John Wilson, from the Coalition to Abolish the Fur Trade, said: "We are gathered here today because of our disgust at Ms Jenkins who professes to be against animal cruelty and the fur trade."

Followed by a group of bagpipe players, Ms Jenkins, who is from Neath, visited the shop's stationery, pets and musical instruments departments.

She was pictured buying two Jasmine di Milo dresses - one in grey and one in black.

She told reporters: "Personally I do not eat meat or wear fur, but people are entitled to their opinions."

Some bargain-hunters had been queuing from midnight to buy goods marked down by as much as 50%.

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SEE ALSO
Singer Jenkins moves to new label
20 Oct 08 |  Entertainment
Lewis axed Harrods event over fur
10 Oct 08 |  Entertainment

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