Page last updated at 16:21 GMT, Saturday, 15 November 2008

Students join fight to save tram

Artist's impression of tram
It is hoped the Cross River Tram would ease pressure on Tube lines

Student leaders have pledged their support to help save a multi-million pound cross-river tram service, recently shelved by London's mayor.

The 1.3bn route from Camden Town in north London to Peckham in south London will reduce congestion and revive south-east London say its supporters.

But Boris Johnson axed the plans, among other projects, to save 2.4bn over the next 10 years.

Students now plan a University of London-wide campaign on the issue.

Vital service

The push is being organised by Liberal Youth - the student movement for the Liberal Democrat party.

Edwin Loo, campaigns officer for the London School of Economics (LSE) Liberal Democrats, said the service is vital for students.

Losing the tram will be a body blow for over 90,000 students who live and study along its route and we're not going to let this go down without a fight
Edwin Loo, campaigns officer

The tram would not only pass through the LSE but also University College London, King's College London, School of Oriental and Asian Studies and the main University of London site in Bloomsbury, central London, he said.

"Losing the tram will be a body blow for over 90,000 students who live and study along its route and we're not going to let this go down without a fight," he said.

The tram link, which would pass through Brixton, Peckham, Elephant & Castle, Waterloo, Holborn, Euston and Camden Town, was first proposed in 2001 and campaigners said the case for it still stands.

Under the plans, trams would run on separate lanes to other traffic and offer a hop-on, hop-off service at the same cost as a bus journey.

A spokesman for the mayor said: "Communities along the proposed route of the tram are due to benefit from the increased capacity and more frequent services on the Northern, Victoria and Piccadilly lines.

"In addition, the mayor has asked Transport for London (TfL) and the London Development Agency (LDA) to look at alternative proposals to serve these areas including separating the northern line to further increase capacity and improvements to local bus services."



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05 Nov 08 |  London

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