Page last updated at 21:18 GMT, Thursday, 6 November 2008

TfL scraps projects and cuts jobs

DLR-generic
Plans to extend DLR to Dagenham Docks have been shelved

Several major transport schemes have been scrapped and jobs could be lost as Transport for London (TfL) tries to save 2.4bn over the next 10 years.

The Thames Gateway Bridge, the Docklands Light Railway extension to Dagenham Docks and the cross-river tram are being shelved in the savings plan.

However, London Mayor Boris Johnson said 39bn would be spent on projects like Crossrail and Tube improvements.

The London Labour Group said he had made a "bonfire" of transport projects.

Tram scheme

Dropped schemes include a 1.3bn cross-river tram plan, a 500m Thames Gateway Bridge scheme in east London, and a 750m extension of the Docklands Light Railway to Dagenham Dock.

Also axed are a 500m Oxford Street tram scheme, a 170m Croydon Tramlink extension and public space proposals for a number of areas including Parliament Square and the Victoria Embankment.

Over the next decade, 39bn will be spent on projects such as Crossrail and Underground improvements, including air-conditioned trains, and improving traffic flow and congestion, Mr Johnson said.

SCRAPPED SCHEMES
1.3bn cross-river tram plan which would have connected Peckham to Camden
500m Thames Gateway Bridge scheme in east London
750m extension of the Docklands Light Railway to Dagenham Dock in east London
500m Oxford Street tram scheme
170m Croydon Tramlink extension
Public space proposals for a number of areas including Parliament Square and the Victoria Embankment

He also pledged to deliver transport projects for when London hosts the Olympics in 2012 and to complete the East London line extension to the London Overground network.

He also promised to increase capacity on the Docklands Light Railway and a new Routemaster, a jump on jump off, open platform, double-decker bus

Mr Johnson said: "London is the engine of the UK economy and it is vital that we continue to invest in better transport during these tough times.

"But at the same time, we need to focus on the projects that deliver real benefits for Londoners, and let go of those that lack the funding for completion.

"These projects still require a total of over 3bn in funding from the government or other sources.

At a time when Londoners are struggling it is our duty to get maximum bang for their buck
Boris Johnson

"At a time when Londoners are struggling it is our duty to get maximum bang for their buck and invest in fully-funded schemes that we know can be delivered."

TfL said it aimed to avoid redundancies but a spokesman said the organisation was looking at "de-layering of management" and was looking at "reductions in headcount", which would include reducing the reliance it had on outside consultants.

The Rail, Maritime and Transport union said any job losses resulting from the cutbacks would be resisted.

The London Assembly Labour Group criticised the cut-backs, saying that the Thames Gateway Bridge had the potential to create 42,000 jobs.

'Double whammy'

Val Shawcross, Labour's transport spokeswoman, said: "The mayor has said a lot about the need to invest in major projects for the sake of London's economy.

"Yet here he is making a bonfire of much-needed transport schemes vital to the economic regeneration of the city."

Both the Green Party and Friends of the Earth had opposed the bridge scheme.

Greenwich Council said the decision to scrap the proposed Thames Gateway Bridge was "truly shocking".

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The scrapped projects include an extension to the Docklands Light Railway.



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