Page last updated at 19:41 GMT, Wednesday, 5 November 2008

Inquest win for student's family

Jerry Duggan
British pathologists said Mr Duggan was beaten around the head

The family of a student killed in a "state of terror" after unwittingly attending a far-right event in Germany have come closer to a fresh inquest.

Jeremiah Duggan, from Golders Green, north London, died in 2003 during the extremist event, the High Court heard.

His mother Erica Duggan, won permission to challenge the government's refusal to consent to a High Court application for permission for a new inquest.

Lawyers for the Attorney General said his death was properly investigated.

After the hearing at the High Court, Mrs Duggan said: "What kind of justice system puts a bereaved mother in the situation of having to fight through the courts for what is my right to find out why my son died?"

'Nothing odd'

Mr Duggan was found on a motorway in Wiesbaden on 27 March 2003. German police said he had run into the path of two oncoming cars.

A German coroner recorded a verdict of suicide.

But British coroners later said Mr Duggan was in "a state of terror" when he died and recorded a narrative verdict.

The coroner's pathologist who carried out a post mortem examination on his body on its return to the UK said his injuries were consistent with being beaten around the head.

However, Cecilia Ivimy, appearing for the Attorney General, said: "Police and doctors attended very promptly.

"The police and doctors and an independent investigator found nothing odd about the scene to suggest to them this was not a traffic accident, as it appeared."



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