Page last updated at 20:50 GMT, Monday, 27 October 2008

London landmarks deemed 'at risk'

tourist in London
Tourism officials say London's landmarks are not at risk

A leading guidebook publisher has included some of London's best-loved sites on a list of attractions that are worth seeing before they vanish.

Frommer's new "500 Places to See Before They Disappear" includes the Tower of London and the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich on its 'endangered' list.

The author, Holly Hughes, maintains that climate change, decay and over-development are the key culprits.

But operators said London's heritage will be around for generations to come.

The new guidebook also lists Battersea power station, the Strawberry Hill folly in Twickenham, west London, and a tiny Georgian street in north London's Kentish Town as being at risk.0

I think these claims are somewhat sensationalist and there is no doubt these iconic places are going to be around for generations to come
Rania Wannous, Visit London

Sally Smith, a spokeswoman for Frommer's guides, told BBC News that in the case of the Tower of London - home to the Crown Jewels - water was the creeping enemy.

"For anyone living in London [the Tower of London] is a key part of our heritage," she said.

"It has nearly 900 years of history and it is under threat because the land is sinking and that means it gets flooded regularly."

Rising waters

But tower spokesman Keith Cima said: "We take prudent precautions to make sure we are prepared in the future if the water does come very high."

The rising waters of the River Thames have also put the Greenwich Maritime Museum on the list of places that could disappear before the end of the century.

Rania Wannous of Visit London said London's landmarks were well protected by the Thames Barrier and reassured Londoners and visitors that the list was a bit premature.

"I think these claims are somewhat sensationalist and there is no doubt these iconic places are going to be around for generations to come."

The guidebook also lists Little Green Street in Kentish Town as one of London's last remaining examples of a typical Georgian street and worries that developers will erase its unique character with the passage of time.

Ms Hughes also fears that Battersea power station's ongoing development limbo will stop it being preserved in the long term.




RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific