Page last updated at 12:39 GMT, Monday, 28 July 2008 13:39 UK

Four hurt as bus hits rail bridge

Bus crash
The bus was taking passengers from Clapham Junction to Willesden Junction

Four people suffered minor injuries when a double-decker bus crashed into a railway bridge in west London.

The rail replacement bus service was taking passengers from Clapham Junction to Willesden Junction when it crashed on Old Oak Common Lane in Acton.

Transport for London (TfL) said the bus was not on its "approved route" during the incident at 1745 BST on Sunday.

First Group, the company which ran the bus service, said it had launched an investigation into the crash.

A TfL spokesperson said: "Four people received minor injuries and were taken to hospital and later released.

"The bus was in service when the incident occurred but not on its approved route."

'Interviewing driver'

Of the four people injured, three were passengers and one was a pedestrian.

The bus service was replacing the west London section of the London Overground line which was out of service because of improvement works being carried out by Network Rail all weekend.

"The bus shouldn't have gone that way," said Michael Steward, from First Group.

"We've launched an investigation which will include interviewing the driver to find out what his story is."




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