Page last updated at 17:44 GMT, Friday, 13 June 2008 18:44 UK

Bus driver jailed for death crash

Ismail Ahmed
Ahmed was accused of "complete disregard for the safety of others".

A bus driver has been jailed for crashing into three generations of the same family, killing a grandmother and maiming her granddaughter.

Ismail Ahmed, 43, was sentenced to four years at Kingston Crown Court for causing death by dangerous driving and grievous bodily harm.

Ahmed, from Southall, west London, drove at "excessive speed" into a bus depot during morning rush hour traffic.

The incident happened in Mortlake, south-west London, in April 2007.

'Complete disregard'

Sentencing him, Judge Susan Matthews said his actions "arose out of impatience, frustration and complete disregard for the safety of others.

"It was triggered in part by the length of time you were waiting to get out of the way of the other drivers," she said.

I don't believe that he is sorry. It is just lies. He had road rage that day.
Mother

The court heard that "tempers had become frayed" as his bus held up morning traffic minutes before the incident.

The bus in front of him had not moved forward but after some minutes Ahmed put his foot on the accelerator.

He told the court he intended to inch forward but the vehicle moved with such speed that it careered into the bus in front.

University-educated Ahmed expressed "deep remorse and shock".

But the mother of the baby girl, whose leg has since been amputated, said: "I don't believe that he is sorry. It is just lies. He had road rage that day."

She said that she and her family would now campaign to close the bus station, which she said was often very congested, to avoid any further tragedies.


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