Page last updated at 16:44 GMT, Wednesday, 4 June 2008 17:44 UK

Climbie social worker wins appeal

Lisa Arthurworrey
Ms Arthurworrey was sacked for misconduct

A social worker responsible for the welfare of eight-year-old Victoria Climbie has won her appeal to continue working in her role.

The Care Standards Tribunal (CST) upheld Lisa Arthurworrey's appeal against the decision not to register her as a social worker.

Victoria was murdered by her great-aunt Marie Therese Kouao and her boyfriend Carl Manning in Haringey, north London.

The pair are serving life sentences for her murder in 2000.

Ms Arthurworrey was sacked by Haringey Council in 2002 for misconduct and banned from working with children in the wake of Victoria's death.

This is someone who has had an unimaginable experience and was subject to a media frenzy following the Victoria Climbie inquiry
Ian Johnston, British Association of Social Workers chief executive

She appealed against the ban and a tribunal found in her favour in 2005.

Following this she applied to register as a social worker with the General Social Care Council (GSCC) but her application was refused.

Social workers cannot practise without being registered with the GSCC.

A Tribunals Service spokesperson said: "The tribunal recommends that Ms Arthurworrey is the subject of intensive supervision, should serve a probationary period and should be regularly assessed for at least three years."

The parents of Victoria had welcomed Ms Arthurworrey's successful appeal against the ban preventing her from working with children.

'Unbelievable abuse'

They called her a "convenient scapegoat" and demanded accountability from senior managers.

A spokesman for the GSCC said it was "disappointed" at the CST's decision.

Ms Arthurworrey was represented throughout the hearing by the British Association of Social Workers (BASW).

Chief executive of BASW, Ian Johnston, said he was pleased that a very long-standing issue had been brought to an end.

"This is someone who has had an unimaginable experience and was subject to a media frenzy following the Victoria Climbie inquiry," he said.

"As a professional organisation we are naturally concerned that the activities of social workers are independently scrutinised but sometimes processes like this can unfortunately scapegoat a few individuals whose practices may not vary greatly from others who don't have the misfortune of having to deal with such unbelievable abuse."

Victoria died from malnutrition and had 128 separate injuries at the time of her death.


RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific