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Last Updated: Monday, 5 June 2006, 13:30 GMT 14:30 UK
7 July report: Survivors' views
Survivors of the 7 July London bombings have renewed calls for a public inquiry into the attacks, as a London Assembly report highlights shortcomings in the emergency response.

BEN THWAITES, WOUNDED ON EDGWARE ROAD TRAIN

Ben Thwaites
Ben Thwaites feels a public inquiry could now be more likely

It's very important that the public should know the problems that they could face.

I feel that the more that's known the more likely it is that we'll have a public inquiry to make sure that answers are found, not just in communications, but across the broad range of issues that were raised on 7 July.

As I walked through from the Edgware Road platforms there were medics standing around without equipment. They hadn't been given the go-ahead to go back into the tunnels so I couldn't get them to come back and help.

There were ambulances arriving upstairs with no equipment because they'd already gone to other sites and dropped off supplies there. We were literally rifling through Marks and Spencer to get medical equipment from their shelves.

That was the survivors doing that as much as the people who were sent to help us.

MICHAEL HENNING, INJURED IN ALDGATE BLAST

Michael Henning
Michael Henning pictured on the day of the Aldgate Tube bomb

What comes out of this report will shock a lot of people.

At no point did I expect that we would have to get ourselves out. We were expecting to be rescued.

There were no medical supplies to be used and people were improvising with ties and belts, with little medical experience.

It seems from today that if it happened this week much the same would happen. The lessons haven't been learnt.

What I desperately feel inside, having seen what I've seen and thinking that probably more lives could have been saved, is that we should have a proper, full investigation to go into every angle so when it does happen - and it is a when and not an if - people are properly cared for and the emergency response is correct.

I think a public inquiry has got to go into more depth than the London Assembly have done, which had a very limited remit.

I think the investigation needs to be public, open and the bereaved families especially need the truth.

RACHEL NORTH, IN SAME CARRIAGE AS RUSSELL SQUARE BOMB

Rachel North
Rachel North wants more information in the public arena

The public are at risk. We're the people on the trains and buses and streets.

If you put all this information together and you have people sharing information in the public domain then the police, the ambulances, London Underground, the government and different departments are all talking to each other then, and only then, will I feel really safe.

That is when we'll have transparency and that is how we'll really honestly be learning the lessons of 7 July.

RAY LANGTON, TUBE PASSENGER

I was on the next train into Liverpool Street after the explosion and the police did a very efficient job of clearing the station and surrounding areas.

Could they have stopped the initial bombings? No way. You can't prepare for this sort of 'random' event.




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See scenes from the day of the attacks




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