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Last Updated: Monday, 7 March, 2005, 10:43 GMT
Search for WWII bomber wreckage
The crashed Dornier on Victoria Station forecourt, picture from City of Westminster archives
The German plane crashed onto the station forecourt at Victoria
Historians will survey Victoria railway station for evidence of a Luftwaffe bomber brought down in one of the most famous crashes in World War II.

The site will be excavated in September if radar scans detect remains of its fuselage beneath the forecourt.

During the Battle of Britain, pilot Ray Holmes ran out of ammunition so he flew his Hurricane into the German Dornier on 15 September 1940.

He used his aircraft to slice off the bomber's tail before bailing out.

Piece of history

It is thought the German bomber may have been on a mission to destroy Buckingham Palace.

The engine and control panel of Sergeant Holmes' Hurricane was found last May near Buckingham Palace and is now on display at the Imperial War Museum.

Aviation historian Chris Bennett, who is leading the search, said the Dornier's remains are believed to be beneath the pavement on the corner of Wilton Road.

He told BBC News: "It is an important piece of history and it is a challenge to find the plane. It is the most famous crash in World War II."

If the excavation goes ahead in September, it would coincide with the unveiling of a memorial in Embankment marking Battle of Britain Day.

A spokeswoman from Network Rail said it would make sure no disruption is caused for passengers.


SEE ALSO:
WW2 bomber pulled from sand
04 Jul 02 |  Scotland


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