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Last Updated: Friday, 2 September 2005, 15:53 GMT 16:53 UK
Railway death mother 'depressed'
Southall station on Wednesday evening
The family was near the station the morning before they died
A mother who jumped to her death from a rail station platform with her two children was thought to be depressed, a religious leader has said.

Navjeet Sidhu, 27, and her two children were hit by a Heathrow Express train travelling up to 100mph in Southall, west London, on Wednesday.

Mrs Sidhu and her daughter, five, died instantly. Her baby died in hospital.

Hinmat Singh Sohi, of a Sikh Temple in Southall, said: "Some of our community say she was depressed."

Community support

Religious leader Mr Singh Sohi, of the Sri Guru Singh Sabha Gurdwara temple said the deaths were a "heartbreaking tragedy".

"The Sikh community is a big community," he said.

"Everybody's got a good relationship with each other and if the family need anything they can come to the Gurdwara."

Mr Singh Sohi added he did not know the family personally.

Meanwhile, police said CCTV footage had revealed no significant new leads.

Police appeal

A statement from British Transport Police said that on the day of their deaths the family had been near the station between 1100 BST and 1320 BST.

Mrs Sidhu had been wearing a light blue V neck T-shirt and dark blue trousers. Her daughter Simran was wearing a red T-shirt and the baby, Aman, was in light yellow clothing.

Anyone who saw the family is asked to contact police.

Post-mortem examinations were being carried out on Thursday but the results have not yet been released.

About 80 passengers on the high speed train, which was heading towards Heathrow airport, were kept on the train for three hours and then let off at the next stop at Hayes.

The driver had to be treated for shock.


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