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Last Updated: Friday, 25 June, 2004, 19:06 GMT 20:06 UK
Row over teacher's rapist past
A senior judge has called for an inquiry after a convicted rapist was allowed to work as an English teacher - despite police knowing about his past.

Mark Bradshaw, 45, from north London, not only hid his past but lied on his CV and was jailed for eight months for deception at Inner London Crown Court.

Judge Colin Smith said the case "very worrying" in the current climate.

It came in the wake of the Bichard inquiry, which criticised the handling of intelligence on sex offenders.

Bradshaw had served terms for rape and attempted rape before working at the London Skills Institute in Kentish Town, London.

The court heard Rosalind Boote, director of studies at the college, received an anonymous letter saying Bradshaw was a dangerous sex offender, just a few months after he took up the post in April last year

The matter will have to be looked at a very high level because, on the face of it, it reveals a very disturbing state of affairs
Judge Colin Smith

She approached the police but the Public Protection Unit (PPU), responsible for keeping tabs on sex offenders, decided not to confirm the allegations.

They passed the case on to the Multi Agency Public Protection Panel who met in November and once again it was decided not to tell the college as Bradshaw was in a stable relationship and appeared settled in his job.

It was only when a journalist threatened to publish a story on Bradshaw that the employers were informed, the court heard.

Bradshaw was jailed for six years in 1991 for raping a woman in a minicab office.

He then attempted to rape a second woman in 1995, while on home leave.

'Compelling public duty'

Bradshaw got the job teaching English to foreign students after approaching an employment agency in November 2002.

On his CV the dates he gave for being a student were actually the times he was serving his prison terms, which totalled 11 years.

Sentencing Bradshaw after he admitted deception, Judge Colin Smith said: "The matter will have to be looked at a very high level because, on the face of it, it reveals a very disturbing state of affairs.

"There is an obvious compelling public duty on the police to respond promptly and fully to inquiries made by an employer in this extremely sensitive area.

"It is of concern, especially in the current climate, that this sort of situation should have occurred and I know those responsible will want to look carefully at the circumstances of this particular case."

The Bichard inquiry into the Soham child murders criticised Humberside and Cambridgeshire Police and the Home Office for the inadequate handling of intelligence relating to sex offenders.




WATCH AND LISTEN
The BBC's James Westhead
"There are echoes of the failings exposed by the Bichard Inquiry"



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