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Last Updated: Wednesday, 17 September, 2003, 16:08 GMT 17:08 UK
Cleared officer warns recruits
Ali Dizaei
Mr Dizaei said: "I am not going to be bullied out of my job"
A senior police officer who was cleared of dishonesty charges after a major investigation has said he would advise black and Asian recruits to avoid joining the Metropolitan Police.

Allegations that Ali Dizaei, who had been tipped to be Britain's first black chief constable, had fiddled 270 of travelling expenses, were dropped in court on Monday.

Iranian-born Mr Dizaei had already been cleared in another trial of "perverting the course of justice and misconduct" over an accusation that he lied about damage to his BMW car.

It followed a three-year investigation which is estimated to have cost between 3m and 7m - the Met's most expensive inquiry into a single officer.

Mr Dizaei, from Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme he believed he had been victimised because he raised concerns about institutional racism.

Asked whether his advice to other members of ethnic minorities would be to avoid joining the Metropolitan Police, Mr Dizaei replied "yes".

I personally feel this case has been one of the most supervised by independent bodies of any that I have experienced
Deputy Assistant Commissioner Steve House
"Until the commissioner personally intervenes to rid the cancer of racism within the ranks of the Metropolitan Police, then yes, that would be my answer."

The 41-year-old also said: "The judge did not know many aspects of this investigation, which I would like to bring out, either before an independent inquiry or before the civil courts.

"Until the entire picture has been brought out only then somebody can make a right decision as to how I was treated."

Mr Dizaei told the programme on Wednesday that he expected to be reinstated in his post.

"It is fundamentally important that nobody should bully anybody else out of a job. I am not going to be bullied out of my job."

But Deputy Assistant Commissioner Steve House said during the investigation issues had arisen "which still may form part of the internal police disciplinary procedures".

He said he did not believe an independent inquiry was necessary.

"I personally feel this case has been one of the most supervised by independent bodies of any that I have experienced ... my view is that it is not necessary," he said.




SEE ALSO:
Exclusive interview with Ali Dizaei
16 Sep 03  |  Newsnight
Dizaei 'had been set for top'
15 Sep 03  |  London
Officer cleared of dishonesty
15 Sep 03  |  London


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