Page last updated at 19:27 GMT, Wednesday, 10 December 2008

Mouth tape teacher is disciplined

A teacher who taped a pupil's mouth shut and struck another with a pen has been barred from holding a senior position in a school for five years.

The General Teaching Council heard Carolyn Greig had left Bourne Grammar School, in Bourne, Lincs, in 2007.

She told the Birmingham hearing the tape incident had been a joke and the pen had been thrown to another pupil.

But, finding charges of professional misconduct proven, the panel said she had caused "distress" to pupils.

Laboratory chase

Upholding five of seven allegations to be proven, the panel told Greig that taping up the child's mouth, throwing the pen and an incident in which she tucked in a male student's shirt at the front of a class all amounted to unacceptable professional conduct.

It said of the shirt incident: "In the context in which it occurred in the middle of the class it seriously demeaned Pupil B and caused him a considerable amount of embarrassment and distress."

The incidents took place between September 2005 and December 2006 and were outlined during a two-day hearing in five video statements made by pupils.

Allegations that Greig had stuck a piece of cardboard over the mouth of a sixth-form student and chased another pupil around a science laboratory were not proven.

Imposing a Conditional Registration Order, the panel said: "We are satisfied that your misconduct is sufficiently serious to require a Disciplinary Order and that a Reprimand would not be adequate in all the circumstances."

Greig will also be required to attend a classroom management training course in the next nine months.



Print Sponsor


RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific