Page last updated at 12:02 GMT, Wednesday, 10 June 2009 13:02 UK

Survey to measure garden wildlife

Garden birds
Experts said they were interested in sightings from a full year

Residents in Leicester are being asked to keep an eye on their gardens as part of a city wildlife survey.

The city council and environmental charity Groundwork said the week-long event would help them gauge the health of wildlife in the area.

Sightings of animals and birds in domestic surroundings over the past 12 months are being compiled.

Officials said the Garden Watch event would allow them to try and protect species and habitats under pressure.

City council nature conservation officer Helen O'Brien said they expected to hear of a diverse set of visitors

She said: "This might include foxes, squirrels, birds such as robins, blue tits or starlings, and also wetland specialists such as frogs, toads or newts.

"By finding out what people have seen it can help us to understand how wildlife is surviving in the city and what we need to do to make sure it is going to be around for many more years for people to enjoy."

Garden Watch will have a stall in Leicester Market on 13 June.



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