Page last updated at 12:37 GMT, Wednesday, 20 May 2009 13:37 UK

Keepers nursing abandoned owlets

Owl chick
The chicks are opening their eyes, putting on weight, and being very vocal

Eagle owl chicks said to look like "little goblins" are being hand-reared by keepers at a wildlife park in Kent after their mother abandoned them.

Cali Bebbington and Christine Reed had to take the two babies under their wings after their real parent failed to look after them at Wildwood.

Ms Bebbington said the pair looked like "little goblins" but were "very cute".

She said they needed regular feeding, and were opening their eyes, putting on weight and already being very vocal.

But they were so demanding, the keepers took one each.

Ms Bebbington said of her chick: "At first, I was very worried and kept checking on him all the time, but he is really getting on well."

The Wildwood Trust said eagle owls, the largest and most powerful owl in Europe, are no longer found in the UK but were once resident here.

And with populations recovering across Europe, it is possible they may re-colonise the UK in the future.

The two chicks will be trained to fly from the glove, so they can be used to help educate people who visit Wildwood.



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