Page last updated at 15:53 GMT, Wednesday, 18 June 2008 16:53 UK

Campaign remembers railway victim

Jade Kenyon (credit PA/British Transport Police)
Jade Kenyon was taking a shortcut home when she was killed

The parents of a girl killed when she touched a live rail are backing a new campaign to draw attention to the dangers of trespassing on tracks.

Jade Kenyon, 17, from Snodland, Kent, died two years ago when she made contact with a rail while taking a shortcut home with a friend.

Her family has been campaigning for more information on the dangers of railway lines to be made available.

Now a DVD highlighting her story is being shown at local schools.

Jade's grandfather Barry Kenyon welcomed the initiative but said more still needed to be done.

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The family has been campaigning for more information on the dangers of railway lines

He wants more money spent on warning devices alongside tracks, such as cameras and sensors, along with other deterrents.

Her mother Rachel Farrington said: "I cannot, as a mother, educate my children if I do not understand the dangers."

That was why the DVD was so important, she said.

Kent Police say there are daily reports of children trespassing on the railways.

Pc Graham Cottingham of British Transport Police said: "Railway lines are not playgrounds.

"Children may not realise the electricity is on all the time even when there are no trains in sight."




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