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Last Updated: Monday, 8 January 2007, 12:05 GMT
Christmas trees help wild horses
Konik horses
The Konik horses were imported from a reserve in Holland
Shredded Christmas trees are being used to improve the living conditions of a herd of wild horses on a nature reserve in a Kent city centre.

The 13 Konik horses, from Holland, were introduced to the 300-acre Whitehall Meadow, on the banks of the River Stour in Canterbury, in November.

The trees are being shredded and used to mulch a stockage at the reserve to prevent it becoming too muddy.

It will provide an area for horses which become ill to receive treatment.

Prehistoric times

The horses have been imported in a partnership between Canterbury City Council and wildlife and environment charity, Wildwood Trust.

They are the closest living relatives of the extinct Tarpan, the wild forest horse which roamed Britain in prehistoric times.

The aim is that by grazing the marshy land, the horses will create ideal living conditions for birds such as geese, spoonbills, bitterns and corncrakes and help restore the nature reserve.

Christmas trees for recycling should be taken to the Wildwood discovery park near Herne Bay.




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