Page last updated at 15:43 GMT, Sunday, 28 September 2008 16:43 UK

Councils unite against toll rise

Humber Bridge
The councils want the community to force a public enquiry

Four local authorities have united to fight plans to increase tolls on the Humber Bridge.

Hull City Council, East Riding of Yorkshire Council, North Lincolnshire Council and North East Lincolnshire Council want the increase rejected.

In a joint letter, the councils have asked the government to consider how another increase would create "financial difficulties" in the area.

If approved, the cost of a return car journey would be 5.80.

Lorries would have to pay 39.80 for the same journey if the Humber Bridge Board, which runs the bridge, is successful.

Public inquiry

The councils said the Humber Bridge already had the highest tolls in the country.

About 21m is collected each year at the bridge, but only 3m is needed to cover the costs of operating it.

Councillor Stephen Parnaby said: "We are totally committed to achieving a successful and dynamic city region, but we believe its potential is seriously constrained by high toll charges."

The councils are also asking people living in East Yorkshire and using the bridge to write to the government's Department for Transport to request a public inquiry on the issue.

People have until 6 October to write and object to the proposed toll rise.




SEE ALSO
Increase in Humber Bridge tolls
22 Aug 08 |  Humber

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