Page last updated at 11:19 GMT, Wednesday, 3 September 2008 12:19 UK

Market move to scupper CD pirates

CD [generic]
The council said the sale of fake CDs and DVDs funded other crimes

The sale of CDs and DVDs has been banned at a Hull market in a bid to stamp out trade in counterfeit goods.

Police and council officers have joined forces with the operators of the popular Walton Street market in a major campaign to scupper pirate activity.

Stallholders have been told the sale of CDs, DVDs and other "audio visual goods" will no longer be accepted.

Hull City Council conceded that legitimate traders would suffer, but it could no longer tolerate fake sales.

A council spokesman said: "We have been asked 'What about the people who are selling CDs and DVDs legitimately?'

The sale of counterfeit goods is an illegal activity and will not be tolerated in this city
Hull City Council statement

"But we need to do something about this trade which has been quite a problem for some time.

"Even high-profile prosecutions in the past have not stopped the sales.

"We have worked with the market operators, Town and Country Markets, to produce an agreed action plan, which will introduce measures aimed at preventing the sale of counterfeit audio visual goods.

"The plan has also been agreed with Humberside Police who are supporting the actions the council and Town and Country Markets are taking.

"The sale of counterfeit goods is an illegal activity and will not be tolerated in this city."

Security has also been stepped up at the site in west Hull to prevent counterfeit traders gaining access to the market.

"Hull City Council aims to prevent illegal counterfeit trading, whilst actively supporting those market stall operators and car booters that trade legally from Walton Street to ensure the continued success of the market," the council spokesman said.




SEE ALSO
Police operation nets fake DVDs
14 Mar 08 |  Humber

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