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Last Updated: Saturday, 12 April, 2003, 09:35 GMT 10:35 UK
Garden celebrates Victorian printer
Benjamin Fawcett
Benjamin Fawcett was at the forefront of colour printing
A memorial has been created to commemorate a pioneering Victorian printer.

From his workshop in Eastgate, Driffield, East Yorkshire, Benjamin Fawcett was one of the great colour printers of the 19th Century.

Using a production-line system of hand-colouring, in 1848 he published the first colour guidebook to Britain's birds, called "A History of British Birds".

Now a garden on the site of his former home and workshop has been officially opened.

The centrepiece is a large horse chestnut tree that was there in Fawcett's time.

Dorothy Gatti
Dorothy Gatti has worked to see the garden established

Members of the Fawcett family have gathered in Driffield for the occasion.

Great granddaughter Dorothy Gatti has come from Australia.

She said: "It's fantastic. I have been in contact with Driffield Town Council for the last 10 years.

"To see this finally culminate in this beautiful garden is great. Benjamin would have been thrilled."

Keen ornithologist

Benjamin Fawcett was born in Bridlington in 1808.

At the age of 14 he was apprenticed to William Forth, a local bookseller and printer.

In 1831 he moved to Driffield where he set up his own business.

"A History of British Birds" was a collaboration with the Reverend Francis Orpen Morris, who was vicar of the nearby village of Nafferton and a keen ornithologist.

These days single prints produced by Benjamin Fawcett sell for hundreds of pounds.




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