Page last updated at 14:11 GMT, Thursday, 25 March 2010

Evesham school head sorry for playground 'murder' stunt

Gun (genric)
The 'shooting' was meant to be part of a 'CSI' style lesson

Some children at a Worcestershire school were left in tears when teachers staged a mock gangland shooting in the playground as part of a lesson.

Pupils at Blackminster Middle School near Evesham were called into the playground on Tuesday.

A clapper board sounded and a teacher fell to the floor, pretending to have been shot dead.

Head teacher Terry Holland admitted the acting was "a bit too enthusiastic," and apologised to parents.

It was sick what they did at school today
Pupil on Facebook

The scene was scripted as part of a crime scene investigation science lesson for the 380-pupil school.

Mr Holland said: "I think the acting was a a bit too enthusiastic. There was some concern because they [the children] weren't totally clear what was happening.

"There was only a very small group that didn't believe it was a spoof, and they were immediately looked after by staff."

'Mixed reception'

There were comments left on the school's Facebook site by pupils.

One posted: "It was sick what they did at school today. The (sic) faked Mr Kent's death."

Another, using text-style language, wrote: "Most of us were soo scared we was cryin!! it was horrible but its gd tht they sed sorry."

Some parents have contacted the school to complain about the incident.

Mr Holland added: "It's had a mixed reception, its fair to say. Some people were very upset about it.

"I think probably it was a step too far, in the way the script was handled."



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