Page last updated at 18:52 GMT, Saturday, 16 January 2010

Woman dies as train hits two cars in Herefordshire

The crash scene
An investigation has started into how the crash happened

A woman was killed when her car and another vehicle were hit by a train on a level crossing in Herefordshire.

The 50-year-old, who lived locally, was airlifted from the scene of the crash which happened at about 1030 GMT but died later in hospital.

Her husband was also injured, as were a mother and daughter in the second car.

A spokesman for British Transport Police said they were investigating the cause of the collision which happened near the village of Moreton-on-Lugg.

The woman's husband suffered pelvic and shoulder injuries and is being treated at Hereford County Hospital.

The mother and daughter suffered minor injuries, West Midlands Ambulance Service said.

Line closed

The driver of the 0830 GMT Arriva Trains Wales train from Manchester Piccadilly to Milford Haven was checked by paramedics at the scene while a number of passengers were treated for shock.

It is not yet known how the cars came to be on the track. The level crossing has barriers and lights and there is a signal box nearby.

The investigation involves British Transport Police, West Mercia Police and Network Rail while the Rail Accident Investigation Branch has been informed.

The line has remained closed and will remain out of service while investigations take place and the vehicles are removed, police said.

Ch Insp Kevin Marshall, of the British Transport Police, said: "The railway is a very dangerous place.

"But on this occasion I'm keeping a really open mind about what happened."



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