Page last updated at 15:33 GMT, Sunday, 25 October 2009

Record numbers in Great South Run

Mo Farah
Mo Farah was the first Briton to win the Great South Run since 1996

Record numbers of runners have taken part in the Great South Run in Portsmouth.

Organisers said 21,000 people entered the 10-mile (16km) road race, which began in Southsea on Sunday morning.

The men's race was won by Mo Farah, from London, who beat Stephen Mokoka by one second to finish in 46 minutes and 26 seconds.

Ines Monteiro took the women's title in 52 minutes 32 seconds ahead of fellow Portuguese Ana Dulce Felix.

Difficult conditions

Farah was the first Briton to win the Great South Run since Gary Staines scored his third and final victory in 1996.

"We went through 10km, and I knew it was quite fast, and with the last two miles knowing it was going to be windy, I was thinking I must keep some energy because conditions weren't easy," Farah said after finishing.

"The crowd made a big difference for me, they kept cheering my name - it's a nice feeling, particularly in those last two miles."

Apart from elite athletes, the race attracts celebrities, sports stars, club runners and fundraisers.

The race has been held in Portsmouth since 1991 and the route passes many of the city's most famous landmarks.

Millions of pounds are raised for good causes each year.

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Great Britain's Mo Farah talks to reporters after winning the Great South Run in Portsmouth after a thrilling sprint finish.



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