Page last updated at 09:00 GMT, Thursday, 11 September 2008 10:00 UK

Birthday at home for 'tombstoner'

Sonny Wells
A remorseful Sonny Wells admits the leap was a "stupid" act

A man left paralysed after jumping from a pier in a practice known as "tombstoning" has spent his first day at home since the accident.

Sonny Wells enjoyed a family meal on Saturday to celebrate his 21st birthday but returned to hospital the next day.

The former soldier from Waterlooville has been confined to a wheelchair after leaping from Southsea's South Parade Pier into water 1m (3ft) deep in May.

He is hoping to return home permanently in time for Christmas.

His father Robbie Wells said: "It was only a day out of hospital but it was great to see him back home.

'Stupid act'

"He thoroughly enjoyed it.

"The hospital has given him November or December as a possible date for coming home but that could drift.

"He has learned to dress himself, get out of bed and transfer from his wheelchair to his furniture."

A BBC film about a 21-year-old is to be used by police to warn children of the dangers.

Speaking to the BBC from his hospital bed in June, Sonny admitted it was a "stupid" act but has vowed not to dwell on his actions.

"Looking back I feel stupid for doing it. But at the end of the day you cannot keep looking back," he said.


SEE ALSO
Police to use 'tombstone' video
20 Jun 08 |  Hampshire
Remorse of paralysed 'tombstoner'
17 Jun 08 |  Hampshire
Photo shows injured 'tombstoner'
15 May 08 |  Hampshire
Pier jumper 'may not walk again'
13 May 08 |  Hampshire
Officers probe man's pier plunge
12 May 08 |  Hampshire
Man injured in 'tombstoning dive'
11 May 08 |  Hampshire

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