Page last updated at 11:49 GMT, Thursday, 22 May 2008 12:49 UK

Net tightens on uninsured drivers

Crushed car
Uncollected cars which have been seized are sent to the crusher

More than 10,000 Hampshire drivers without a valid driving licence or insurance have had their vehicles seized since July 2005.

They were caught using powers under section 165 of the Road Traffic Act.

Once a vehicle has been seized the owner or driver has 14 days to produce the correct documents at a police station or it will be sold or crushed.

A charge of 105 is made for the cars to be returned. Fixed penalty tickets issued can result in a 200 fine.

The driver may also receive six penalty points on a driving licence.

Many of those who choose to drive without a licence or insurance are often found to be involved in other criminal activity
Hampshire police

"Unlicensed and uninsured drivers frequently cause distress and misery to others," said John Martin, head of the Hampshire police's contract vehicle recovery scheme.

"Many of those who choose to drive without a licence or insurance are often found to be involved in other criminal activity."

When the legislation was first used in 2005 about 43% of vehicles were reclaimed after being seized, a force spokesman said.

That figure has risen to about 57%.

Neil Drane, of the Motor Insurers' Bureau (MIB), the organisation responsible for the Motor Insurance Database, said: "A key factor in removing uninsured drivers from our roads is the Motor Insurance Database, which contains details of 35 million insured vehicles in the UK."

According to statistics from the MIB, uninsured driving costs law-abiding motorists more than 500m annually or about 30 on their insurance premium.


SEE ALSO
Police crackdown seizes 500 cars
12 Feb 08 |  Edinburgh, East and Fife
Police catch no-seatbelt drivers
06 Feb 08 |  Tayside and Central
Four in 10 motorbikes 'not taxed'
22 Jan 08 |  UK Politics
Car tax crackdown nets over 100
24 Dec 07 |  Edinburgh, East and Fife

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific