Page last updated at 17:21 GMT, Thursday, 2 July 2009 18:21 UK

Rural wind turbine plan rejected

How the wind turbines would look
Ecotricity wanted to build six 394ft (120m) turbines

Six wind turbines will not be built at a rural beauty spot in north Dorset after councillors unanimously voted to throw out the plans.

Ecotricity wanted to build the 394ft (120m) turbines in Silton.

Hundreds of people packed the meeting in the Olive Bowl conference centre, in Gillingham, while another 100 who could not get in waited outside.

North Dorset District councillors went against their own planning officer's recommendation to approve the scheme.

Save Our Silton campaigners waved banners and placards reading "No giant wind turbines here" and "SOS".

The firm had said the project was crucial.

But the campaigners said they had already sent nearly 2,000 letters of objection.

A North Dorset District Council spokesman told BBC News it had been " a very popular decision".

Earlier, Christopher Langham, chairman of Save Our Silton, said: "We are in favour of renewable energy and don't object to wind farms in the right place.

"The character of this beautiful landscape will be changed and the views from the Cranborne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty will be spoilt.

"Most importantly, the nearest houses are less than 550m away from the turbines."

But a spokeswoman for Ecotricity said properly designed and sited modern windmills did not cause problems for neighbours.



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