Page last updated at 19:29 GMT, Friday, 12 June 2009 20:29 UK

US DNA help to catch fawn killers

Upton Country Park
Eyewitness Keith Arthurs said the fawn looked about two days old

The University of California in America has offered to analyse DNA to help catch three hooded teenagers who stamped a new born deer to death.

Beth Whitton, director of veterinary forensics, saw the BBC article of the attack in Upton Country Park, Poole.

She said any clothing found that was worn by the offenders at the time of the incident on Wednesday could be matched to DNA found on the fawn.

Three donors have come forward to offer a £450 reward to catch the youths.

'Innocent animals'

Ms Whitton said: "It really touched me, because you think of a new born fawn it is so innocent and vulnerable.

"We have to protect the most vulnerable people of society.

"If they could locate items of clothing, shoes, trousers and so forth that were worn by suspects at the time, we could test those items for deer blood and match them with that specific individual deer.

"Study after study has shown the type of people who brutalise innocent animals will go on to have violent criminals activity histories.

"It is important to get to these people and either help them or bring them into the criminal justice system."

Ms Whitton is awaiting contact from the officer in the case, who is off until Monday, before DNA can be taken from the fawn.

Concerned residents have offered a reward of £450 for information in the case.

A Dorset woman, who wanted to remain anonymous, has offered £100 and said the youths were "sick".

A Yorkshire resident has donated £250 and a resident from Crawley in West Sussex, £100.

Pc John Snellin, wildlife officer for Dorset Police, described the killing as "barbaric and horrendous".

He said a number of people had come forward and inquiries were being pursued.



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SEE ALSO
Three youths stamp fawn to death
11 Jun 09 |  Dorset
Deer killed and injured in attack
06 Nov 08 |  Lincolnshire

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