Page last updated at 13:43 GMT, Tuesday, 16 December 2008

Giant Christmas tree raises roof

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Christmas tree goes through roof

A family in Dorset has been branching out this Christmas after installing an enormous tree that appears to burst out of their house.

Greig Howe, 35, had to cut the 35ft (10.6m) tree into three parts and remove a window to get it inside his house in Bournemouth.

One part is in his lounge, another in a bedroom and the last piece on the roof so it appears to go through the house.

"From outside it just looks like one tree," said Mr Howe.

The branches are so big some windows have to be kept open.

The 250 tree is decked out with 160 baubles, 2,000 LED lights and a star at the top.

Greig Howe
Greig Howe said he was making up for last Christmas

Mr Howe, who has three sons, Harry, 11, Roni, three, and Finn, one, said: "I let my little boys down last year so this year my 11-year-old asked for a big Christmas tree.

"It looks like a tree has grown in someone's lounge, up into the room above and then out through the roof."

"He [Harry] was really surprised and chuffed when he got home from school and saw it."

It took seven people two days to get the tree into place and has caused a stir among passers-by.

"A lot of people have been stopping outside and knocking on the door, laughing and congratulating me."



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