Page last updated at 21:32 GMT, Monday, 22 March 2010

Lighter Evening Group wants two-hour clock change

Sunset generic
If the clock went forward two hours sunset in June would be about 2200

A campaign group in Devon and Cornwall is calling for clocks to be put forward by two hours in the summer.

The South West Lighter Evening Group believes people in the region would benefit from increased tourism, energy savings and more outdoor activity.

Clocks in the UK currently follow Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) from October to March and British Summer Time (BST) - one hour forward, March to October.

A similar trial was conducted in 1968, but rejected by the government.

If the clocks were put forward by two hours, it would mean summer evenings would be lighter for longer, with the sun setting at about 2200 BST in June.

It's about making the most of the available daylight we have
Angela Wright, South West Lighter Evening Group

Under the group's proposals, clocks would be one hour ahead of GMT in the winter, which would also mean lighter evenings.

Sunrise though - normally at about 0750 - would be delayed until 0850, meaning a darker morning commute to work and school.

Spokeswoman Angela Wright, who runs an adventure park that benefit from such a change, said: "It's about making the most of the available daylight we have."

But Devon poultry farmer Colin Carter said for him it would mean a longer working day.

"I'd have to get up an hour earlier in the morning for my chickens and they wouldn't go to bed any earlier - it would be about 1130 [2330] in the summer."

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA) is in favour of the change.

"It would cut down on the high peak of accidents which occur on the way home from work and school," spokesman Tom Mullarkey told BBC News.

"The net effect would be to save about 100 lives a year in the UK."

Any new trial in the UK would have to be approved by Parliament.



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