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Last Updated: Wednesday, 11 January 2006, 13:27 GMT
Tsunami death lie father jailed
Philip Bosson
Philip Bosson: Three months' jail
A hoaxer has been jailed for wasting police time after claiming he lost a daughter in the Asian tsunami.

Philip Bosson, 39, told officers his daughter Kayleigh had been killed and followed it up with a string of lies.

But three months later, after an international search at a cost of thousands of pounds, police found "Kayleigh" had never existed.

Bosson, of Brixington Lane, Exmouth, Devon, was jailed for three months at Plymouth Magistrates' Court.

District Judge Paul Farmer told him: "By your actions others who could have been assisted sooner could not he helped.

"What you did was to abuse the assistance and the generosity offered by people."

After the tsunami on Boxing Day 2004, father-of-three Bosson flew out to Sri Lanka where he told British police that he had just identified the body of his 19-year-old daughter Kayleigh Dillon at a makeshift beachside mortuary.

Inquiries were made through Interpol and attempts were made to match DNA with thousands of bodies.

Back in England his bogus grief was so convincing during one interview with police that he was taken home by ambulance, the court had heard.

'Seeking attention'

Police only became suspicious when he started to be unhelpful and abusive and changed the spelling of Kayleigh's name.

Officers traced his first girlfriend Michelle Dillon, who revealed that Bosson had picked the name Kayleigh from a favourite Marillion hit of the 1980s.

Neil Lawson, prosecuting, said the time wasted by Devon and Cornwall Police alone equated to more than 6,300, but the true figure was much higher.

Mr Stephen Nunn, defending, said: "The only motive suggested in the pre-sentence report is that he was seeking attention."




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