Page last updated at 15:33 GMT, Saturday, 13 September 2008 16:33 UK

Statue commemorates ancient game

Shrovetide statue
The Shrovetide statue is an abstract view of three players

A statue has been unveiled to commemorate an ancient football game that is played in the streets of a Derbyshire town.

Ashbourne's Royal Shrovetide football game is played annually by hundreds of people from two areas of the town.

They try to pass a Shrovetide ball from one side of the town to the other in a game first played in the Middle Ages.

The 15-foot-high (4.6m) sculpture sits alongside the A52 at the centre of a new office development.

Neil Hawksworth, who designed the statue, said the aim was to create an attractive gateway into the town.

Businessman Peter Gadsby, a former Shrovetide footballer, said the aim was to provide a community facility with the sculpture as its centrepiece.

The sculpture is a modern, abstract design depicting "The Hug" - three players grasping the ball during the football game.

The two-day game is played over Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday and involves players on the Up'ards and Down'ards teams striving to reach goals which are three miles apart.

The official ball is specially made, with a painted crest to identify it.


SEE ALSO
Fake ball probe hits ancient game
15 Feb 08 |  Derbyshire
Tribute to Shrovetide death man
22 Feb 07 |  Derbyshire
Police confirm future event duty
10 Mar 06 |  Derbyshire
1m playing field saved for town
15 Jun 05 |  Derbyshire

RELATED BBC LINKS



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2017 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific