Page last updated at 17:05 GMT, Tuesday, 13 April 2010 18:05 UK

Missing monkey captured in Cumbrian church

Capuchin (generic)
Capuchin monkeys are native to the Amazon basin

A missing South American monkey has been recaptured in a church, five days after escaping from an enclosure at a Cumbrian wild animal park.

The small Capuchin went missing from the South Lakes Wild Animal Park in Dalton on 8 April.

Park staff called in police, fearing for the animal's safety.

The monkey was spotted close to Dalton Railway Station on Tuesday and eventually recaptured when it ran into a nearby church.

A Cumbria Police spokesman said: "Following numerous sightings, the monkey was spotted near the Dalton Railway Station on Tuesday.

'Distinctive' head

"Police along with wildlife park staff followed the creature, which initially went into gardens around Anticross, then crossed into Dalton Cemetery.

"In the cemetery, police and park staff were able to contain and capture the monkey when it ran into one of the old churches.

"It has now been safely returned to the zoo."

Capuchins are native to the Amazon basin, about 20ins (51cm) high and recognisable by a distinctive black or dark brown head with dark sideburns.

They are tree-dwelling and known to use tools such as stones to crack open nuts, shellfish and crabs.



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