Page last updated at 16:44 GMT, Wednesday, 7 October 2009 17:44 UK

Death sparks crossing review call

Wraysholme crossing
Mr Crabtree was killed instantly when the train hit his car

Network Rail has been asked to review the safety of level crossings after the death of a Cumbrian motorist.

Investigators said Jonathan Crabtree, 41, might have been dazzled by the sun and left unable to see warning signs at Wraysholme in November 2008.

He was killed instantly when a train struck his car at the automated crossing near Grange-over-Sands.

Network Rail has been asked to identify all crossings which might pose similar problems because of sunlight.

Mr Crabtree's car was hit by the 0937 Carlisle to Lancaster train which had 32 passengers on board.

Dogs survived

No-one else was seriously injured and the train did not leave the tracks. Mr Crabtree's two dogs, which were in the back of his car, survived the impact.

A Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) report concluded Mr Crabtree could have been unable to see the warning lights at the crossing because the sun was low in the sky at the time.

The RAIB has now asked Network Rail to revise its inspection process to identify crossings which may face similar problems and, where necessary, make improvements.

Network Rail said it was studying the report's recommendations.



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SEE ALSO
Man dies in level crossing crash
03 Nov 08 |  Cumbria

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