Page last updated at 07:44 GMT, Monday, 1 June 2009 08:44 UK

Drink-drive alerts by Bluetooth

Drivers in Cumbria are getting messages on their mobile phones reminding them about the risks of drinking and driving during the summer.

Cumbria Police are using a Bluetooth device that sends an anti-drinking and driving alert to large numbers of mobile phones simultaneously.

The move is part of the force's summer campaign to reduce drinking and driving across the county.

The alerts are being used near busy clubs, pubs and restaurants.

Officers are also increasing the number of breath tests and stop checks during June.

Criminal record

Ch Insp Kevin Greenhow of the Cumbria Police roads policing unit, said: "We are not trying to stop people enjoying themselves, but we do want drivers to act responsibly and keep safe on the roads.

"People need to understand the serious consequences of driving over the prescribed limit.

"They will get caught, face a 12-month driving ban, a criminal record, a substantial fine, higher insurance premiums and may even find themselves without a job."

Assistant Chief Constable Andy Davidson added: "We will continue to proactively target drink-drivers in Cumbria to ensure that our roads remain safe.

"Police and the communities of Cumbria will not tolerate those who put the lives of others at risk by choosing to drive whilst under the influence of drink or drugs."

During last year's summer campaign, officers made 49 arrests compared to 81 in 2007.



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SEE ALSO
Pub-goers get drink-drive warning
30 Nov 07 |  Cumbria
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03 Aug 07 |  Cumbria
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