Page last updated at 19:45 GMT, Wednesday, 14 January 2009

Payout for railway whistleblower

Jim Glencross defended himself at the tribunal

A rail worker has won 200,000 in compensation for being sacked after he blew the whistle on a manager who asked him to lie about an accident.

Jim Glencross, 58, of Carlisle, said Network Rail sacked him because he reported unsafe working practices which led to a colleague being injured.

Network Rail insisted Mr Glencross was sacked for an unrelated matter.

But defending himself at an employment tribunal, Mr Glencross successfully argued he had been unfairly dismissed.

On Wednesday, the tribunal in Carlisle awarded Mr Glencross the six-figure sum to compensate him for lost earnings.

We maintain that Mr Glencross was dismissed as a result of misconduct with regard to safety on the railway, something we take extremely seriously
Network Rail

Mr Glencross said he had originally been pressurised into making a false statement about the accident, which he witnessed in 2004. But after changing his statement he was sacked.

An earlier tribunal hearing unanimously decided Mr Glencross had been unfairly dismissed.

Wednesday's hearing determined the level of compensation.

Mr Glencross said he had tried to avoid any legal action, but felt vindicated by the tribunal decision.

In a statement, Network Rail said: "We maintain that Mr Glencross was dismissed as a result of misconduct with regard to safety on the railway, something we take extremely seriously.

"We remain disappointed that the court did not share this view."

The company said its lawyers were considering the decision.

A further hearing is due to be held to determine whether Mr Glencross was victimised before his dismissal.



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