Page last updated at 20:33 GMT, Thursday, 8 January 2009

Aston Martin boss still confident

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Aston Martin boss optimistic

The owner of Aston Martin says he is confident the firm will emerge from the economic downturn "as strong as ever".

David Richards said he did not expect more job cuts at the firm, which cut 600 staff - a third of its workforce - in December.

The luxury car maker, based in Gaydon, Warwickshire, saw its sales drop 28% during 2008.

Mr Richards said he was confident the strength of the Aston Martin brand would see it through difficult times.

He told the BBC: "It did turn very fast at the end of last year and it means we've got to address things very promptly as well.

'Challenging times'

"We don't take [job cuts] lightly. We looked into it very carefully and... when we do make decisions like this you try to make them once and make them stick and then work through the process after that.

"So I've got every confidence that the initial numbers we've announced are very sound and solid in a future business case."

He added: "We're going through challenging times, quite clearly, but behind it all we've got a great brand in Aston Martin.

"We've got some wonderful products today and going into the future and despite the difficult times we're going to face this year, inevitably, I'm quite certain we're going to come out of this as strong as ever."



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'A year to forget' for carmakers
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Aston Martin cuts 'unacceptable'
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Third of jobs go at Aston Martin
01 Dec 08 |  England

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