Page last updated at 07:52 GMT, Thursday, 24 September 2009 08:52 UK

Plans proposing 1,500 new homes

Developers have put forward plans for 1,500 new homes in Cornwall.

Wainhomes said the plans for the 126-acre site in St Austell included family homes, affordable housing, shops, offices, a school and parks.

Protesters said the plans would devastate the area. Local councillors said they wanted to meet with the developers about the scheme.

Wainhomes said that the scheme was in response to government housing requirements.

Critics are concerned at Wainhomes' plans because 5,000 new homes are already due to be built near the town as part of the clay country eco-town announced in July.

Other smaller developments are also planned.

'Absolutely crazy'

The Mayor of St Austell Brian Palmer said he wanted an urgent meeting with planners and developers to assess the impact on the area.

He said: "We need it to get a grip of the overall picture of all these developments and the potential impact on St Austell and on the surrounding infrastructure."

A protest group has also been formed called Save Our Unspoilt Land (Soul), and has called a public meeting which is due to be held on Thursday evening.

The group's chairman Steven Henry said the location planned for the development was not suitable.

He said: "We have no reservations about the need for some housing, its just where to put it.

"To use up our greenfield and pasture land, of all things, seems absolutely crazy."

Wainhomes said the development would offer many benefits to the mid-Cornwall area and said it had received some encouraging feedback for the scheme.



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