Page last updated at 15:10 GMT, Saturday, 12 September 2009 16:10 UK

Zoo welcomes big baby rodent trio

Capybara
Capybaras are the world's largest rodent and are expert swimmers

A zoo in Cornwall is celebrating the arrival of some new additions to its menagerie - three baby capybaras.

The creatures, which originate from South America and are the world's largest rodent, were born at Newquay Zoo where their mother was also born.

Homer, Harley and Hokey are members of the guinea pig family and will grow to 2ft (60cm) tall and weigh 100lb (45kg).

Head keeper Sam Harley said: "Capybara live in family groups so our plan is to keep them all together at Newquay Zoo."

Capybaras' scientific name means water pig, and their bodies have been specially adapted for swimming - with webbed feet and their eyes, ears and nostrils located on top of their heads.

Although in the wild they are preyed upon by jaguars, anacondas and caiman, humans also hunt them for their meat and skin, which can be turned into leather.

The capybara trio are the latest babies to join the zoo - in June a black wildebeest was born on site and earlier in the year the zoo saw its meerkat family produce seven babies.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Zoo unveils black wildebeest calf
30 Jun 09 |  Cornwall
Venezuela's giant rodent cuisine
12 Apr 09 |  Americas
Zoo's baby meerkats are unveiled
19 Jun 09 |  Cornwall

RELATED BBC LINKS



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific