Page last updated at 18:04 GMT, Monday, 1 December 2008

Stranded dolphins returned to sea

Dolphin rescue
A team of 18 people battled to save the mother and her calf

A stranded dolphin and her calf have been saved after an eight-hour operation in Cornwall.

The two dolphins were found stranded at Frenchman's Creek on the River Helford on Sunday morning.

Vets, coastguards, volunteers and marine experts from British Divers' Marine Life Rescue worked together to successfully refloat the animals.

It is thought the dolphins may have made a navigational error and then were caught out by the tide.

The dolphins were assessed and tagged before being returned to the sea.

Mass stranding

Peter Bullard, watch manager at Falmouth Coastguard, said: "The dolphins were marked with orange biodegradable tape so if they were to come ashore again in the next few days they would be recognised."

Mystery still surrounds the death of 26 dolphins following a mass stranding in the Fal estuary in June.

Post-mortem examinations found the animals were well fed and showed no obvious signs of disease or poisoning.

Theories for the stranding have included sonar from a Royal Navy vessel, being chased by a killer whale or become stranded after going to the help of members of the pod who may have been in distress.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Grim recovery of trapped dolphins
10 Jun 08 |  Cornwall
Mystery of dolphin mass stranding
10 Jun 08 |  Cornwall

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific